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I Have to Enroll in Medicare When I Turn 65, Right?

It’s the question/statement I hear most often.  And the definitive answer is Maybe.


Turning 65 is not the only time you can sign up for Medicare. There are actually four Enrollment Periods for entering Medicare. 


The two most common are:

  • Initial Enrollment Period – 7 months around your 65th birthday

  • Special Enrollment Period – When your employer insurance ends

You must (if you want to avoid a penalty) enroll in Medicare at age 65 if:

  • You are drawing Social Security retirement benefits

  • You are on an individual health insurance policy (from “the exchange”)

  • You are on COBRA or

  • Your employer has less than 20 employees on its group health insurance plan. This is the Gotcha!

For Medicare eligible individuals who are still working and have employer group health insurance with 20 or more employees, it is most often advisable to stick with the employer plan and NOT sign up for Medicare.  A definite exception is someone with a High Deductible Health Plan and a chronic condition that leads to meeting that deductible each year.

 

Contributor: Mj Heins, learn more at: http://medicareinsurancedenver.com/

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Searching for two government publications will be very helpful to those looking for information:


"Medicare and You". (People will get a copy of this in the mail when they turn 65, but a PDF is available online at any time (excluding state specific MAPD rate information).)


"Choosing a MediGap Plan".

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Medicare sign up considerations may be a bit more complicated than presented above. Medicare actually has 4 parts.


Leaving Part C out of the discussion for the moment, a Prospective Medicare Beneficiary should recognize that Parts A, B and D each have different enrollment and penalty considerations.


For example, a person with the HDHP mentioned above who is also contributing to an HSA would likely NOT want to rush to enroll in Part A.


quote from above:

"For Medicare eligible individuals who are still working and have employer group health insurance with 20 or more employees, it is most often advisable to stick with the employer plan and NOT sign up for Medicare."


In most cases, this is appropriate advice…


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